Sanded Grout vs Unsanded Grout

The sanded grout contains an aggregate of silica sand to provide strength to the grout joint. It has a coarse texture and is a bit harder to clean, but it is the best choice for wider tile joints than 1/8 in. because it rejects the gaps of depreciation. Unsanded grout is preferred for joints that are less than in 1/8 wide. This smooth textured grout is most common in ceramic tile installations and firmly attached to vertical surfaces. It is also recommended for the installation of floor or wall tiles with narrow joints. Really with grout, you have a choice of sanded versus unsanded grout. Luckily, since this article will help you choose between those two types of grout for each application in different parts of the house.

The Basic Difference
The main difference between unsanded and sanded grout is the presence or absence of sand. Unsanded cement based grout is a delicate mix of Portland cement, pigment and water powder. Epoxy grouts are made of resin and hardener. Grout-based cement sanded and sanded epoxy grouts are essentially the same as the previously mentioned mix but with added sand. The sand thickens the grout to prevent it from shrinking in the joint. Both cement-based grouts and epoxy grouts come in a type of sanded and unsanded and can both be used with floor and wall tiles. Cement-based grouts are traditionally used in residential applications. Epoxy grouts are more ideal for situations where tiles will be exposed to hard materials, such as acids and greases.

The Size and Type
The size of the shared tile usually determines the type of grout to use, but sometimes the type of tile is the deciding factor. Given the example if unsanded grout is recommended for highly polished tiles, easily scratched like marble because aggregates on sanded grouts can damage the type of tile. Unsanded grout should not be used on the tile floor, however, because the grout can crack and break under pressure from the traffic floor. The size of the shared tile usually determines the type of grout to use, but sometimes the type of tile is the deciding factor. For example, unsanded grout is recommended for highly polished tiles, easily scratched like marble because aggregates on sanded grouts can damage the type of tile. Unsanded grout should not be used on the tile floor, however, because the grout can crack and break under pressure from the traffic floor.

Conclusion
Both sanded vs. unsanded grout can be purchased in epoxy based form and also they are essentially the same as their portland based cement relatives. In certain cases, the main disadvantage of epoxy-based unsanded grout is that it is quite expensive. This is more than twice the cost of traditional unsanded grout. It can also be difficult to work with, due to shorter drug times. However, when it comes to keeping the tile material softer, smoother, the contest between sanded versus unsanded grout is not a contest at all.


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